Afternoon Tea

Written by Ray Davies

from the album, “Something Else by The Kinks”

September 15, 1967

Tea time won’t be the same without my Donna
At night I lie awake and dream of Donna
I think about that small cafe
That’s where we used to meet each day
And then we used to sit a while
And drink our afternoon tea

I’ll take afternoon tea (afternoon tea)
If you take it with me (afternoon tea)
You take as long as you like
‘Cause I like you, girl

I take sugar with tea (afternoon tea)
You take milk if you please (afternoon tea)
Like you talking to me
Because you ease my mind

Ba-ba-ba-ba-ba-ba (afternoon tea)
Ba-ba-ba-ba-ba-ba (afternoon tea)
Ba-ba-ba-ba-ba-ba (afternoon tea)
Ba-ba-ba-ba-ba-ba (afternoon tea)

Tea time still ain’t the same without my Donna
At night I lie awake and dream of Donna
I went to our cafe one day
They said that Donna walked away
You’d think at least she might have stayed
To drink her afternoon tea

I’ll take afternoon tea (afternoon tea)
If you take it with me (afternoon tea)
You take as long as you like
‘Cause I like you, girl

I take afternoon tea (afternoon tea)
Every day of the week (afternoon tea)
Please come along if you like
Because I like you, girl

Ba-ba-ba-ba-ba-ba (afternoon tea)
Ba-ba-ba-ba-ba-ba (afternoon tea)

-The Kinks

The Kinks Band

 

A promotional photo of British rock group en:The Kinks, taken in Stockholm, Sweden, ca. 2 September 1965 (see The Kinks: All Day and All of the Night : Day-By-Day Concerts, Recordings and Broadcasts, 1961-1996, p. 65). From left to right: en:Pete Quaife, en:Dave Davies, en:Ray Davies, en:Mick Avory (the band’s lineup Feb 1964–June 1966, Nov 1966–Mar 1969).

Excerpt from Wikipedia

The Kinks are an English rock band formed in Muswell Hill, north London, in 1964 by brothers Ray and Dave Davies. They are regarded as one of the most influential rock bands of the 1960s.[3][4] The band emerged during the height of British rhythm and blues and Merseybeat, and were briefly part of the British Invasion of the United States until their touring ban in 1965 (as a result of constant fighting between the brothers). Their third single, the Ray Davies-penned “You Really Got Me“,[4][5] became an international hit, topping the charts in the United Kingdom and reaching the Top 10 in the United States.[6] Their music was influenced by a wide range of genres, including American R&B and rock and roll initially, and later adopting British music hallfolk, and country. They gained a reputation for reflecting English culture and lifestyle, fuelled by Ray Davies’ wittily observational writing style.[3][4][5][7]