In Japanese Buddhist culture, tea and longevity have long been associated with each other. The latest study published from the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) seems to show statistically significant scientific evidence that there is, in fact, a positive correlation.

It is very encouraging to see research papers such as these enter the public conscience and awareness. However, I believe there is more to be said about tea and longevity than just its components like epigallocatechins, L-theanines and vitamins.

The simple process of taking 5 minutes out of one’s life to prepare the tea, and taking a light break from the chaos of every day life likely contributes to the correlation of tea and longevity as well.

The JAMA paper and others suggest a correlation between tea consumption in its entirety. This would help explain, at least anecdotally, why Buddhist monks and tea masters who take their time to prepare their matcha teas outlive even the healthiest of tea drinking afficionados. Although this aspect of tea is hard to correlate with scientific exactitude, I believe there is something to be said about taking a brief moment to properly prepare tea as there is to drink it.